Jim Day
Seattle, WA








Jim’s all-time favorite kite flying space is the International Kite Meeting on Fanø, Demark.    He starting attending this Meeting in 2000 and now attends yearly.   This is the place he says  “I can work the problem with any kite...  If it won't fly on Fanø, it won't fly.”  He has strong ties and friendships with many of the kite makers and fliers from Germany, the Netherlands, France and Denmark.  It is here where he discovers new and old kites. Where he learns how to tweak and master kites and their relationship with winds.   

Jim is a lifelong resident of Seattle, Washington, coming from the political bubble that he does, began his career as a self-employed boat builder and later a cabinet maker.  His skills in spatial drafting and design were later transformed to crafting of unique parts and kites.  Jim’s whole life has evolved around the wind. He grew up on Lake Washington; sailing was a regular if not daily activity.  He spent much time sailing around Puget Sound, Hawaii, Alaska and Canada.

Jim enjoyed making Eddy Kites as a child and flying the Japanese figure kites his Dad  (who was stationed in Japan during the Korean War) would bring him.  Years later, about 1984, he spotted a Flexifoil flying on the Lincoln City Beach in Oregon and so began a newfound hobby of kiting.   

In the late 1980s and early 1990s Jim worked with the Fort Worden Kite Makers Retreat organizing workshops and began “Hosting” kite fliers from around the world.   From these kiters he learned kite making techniques, how to work bamboo and miniature making skills.  It was in the early 1990s when Jim began his journey into Kite Aerial Photography, KAPPING.

In the mid 1990’s to 2010, Jim worked closely with Drachen Foundation designing a Box kite, KAPPING kits and teaching children’s kite making.  He has had workshops in England, Germany, Denmark, India, Canada and the US.     
In 2005  Jim began working for the National Geographic,  KAPPING with acclaimed photographer Michael Melford.